Try Jesus? -Bumper Sticker Theology

On our way to the polls this morning, I noticed one of the other cars on the road had several bumper stickers, one of which said, “Try Jesus.”

For some reason, my mind went to last Friday, when we had our car at the dealer for some service.  While we waited, we asked some questions of a very friendly and genuine salesman. (before I go further, I want to let you know that Rachel and I both really appreciated the way this salesman treated us – with respect!)

He invited us to take a test drive. He went on to explain that this dealership allowed prospective buyers to take a test drive home overnight to get a more realistic experience of the car.

We tried the car, but didn’t take it for an overnight.

So, back to the bumper sticker: Do you suppose one could “try” Jesus for a couple times around the block, or, perhaps, even for an overnight?

The longer I live and follow Jesus, the less inclined I am to say yes.  I don’t think Jesus is looking for test-drivers.  I think Jesus is looking for people who are willing to give their entire lives over into God’s hands.

Try that.

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3 thoughts on “Try Jesus? -Bumper Sticker Theology

  1. 1. I know when some folks asked Jesus, “Where do you live?” his response was, “Come and see.” Sounds like an invitation to investigation.

    2. E. Stanley Jones, long time Methodist missionary to India (and other places) taught that the Kingdom of God was Reality and suggested people try living as if it really were Reality. Sounds like an invitation to investigation.

    3. There’s the famous Chesterton quote, “It’s not that the Christian ideal has been tried and found wanting; it’s that it’s been found difficult and left untried.” Not exactly the same notion, but surely a reflection on investigating Jesus. “And he went away sad, because he had many possessions.”

  2. Have you ever noticed how many bumper stickers I have on my car?

    Bumper sticker thinking (if it can be called thinking) is usually from the KISS school. I attend the Complexity school instead.

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