Rights v Right makes wrong

Having the right to do something does not necessarily make doing it the right thing to do.

Case in point: Jacyln Pfieffer was allegedly fired from her position as a teacher at Aloma Methodist Early Childhood Learning Center. Further, she was allegedly fired because it was learned that she was living in a lesbian relationship.

The discussions about this that I’ve seen, and been part of, on social media, tend to end up with people on either of two sides of this polarity

  1. The ECLC was within its rights as a religious organization to fire someone engaged in conduct they believe to be immoral; and
  2. Ms. Pfieffer was a victim of discrimination.

I am not taking sides on that polarity.

Knowing a little about Church-State matters, I expect the ECLC, related to its host Church, may well be perfectly within their rights to have fired her.

Even if they were within their rights as a religious organization, though, I think they blew it. They failed.  They did not represent Jesus well.

This is stronger language than I usually use on this blog, but this is serious business.

Whatever your position on sexuality and orientation and same-sex marriage, if you are a Christian, I assume you would agree that we (Christians) represent Christ, and therefore God.

I think you would also have to agree with this: whether we approve of someone else’s behavior/orientation/lifestyle/fill-in-your-preferred-term-here,we are commanded to love them. All of them; friends, enemies, strangers, etc.

Christians do not get to choose whom to love and whom not to.

But we do, according to the law, receive some leeway according to our religion, in choosing whom to employ and whom not to.

I believe that choice is far better made before hiring than after.

So, even if you fully support Aloma Methodist ECLC’s decision, you must agree that they would have represented Christ better had they been open upfront and refused to hire Ms. Pfeiffer in the first place than to fire her.

I don’t know where the law places the burden of proof. Should Ms. Pfieffer have self-identified as lesbian in the hiring process?

How self-disclosing are you when you apply for a job?

No; from my perspective – and it would be very, very hard to sway me on this – it is on the church-affiliated organization to be very, very clear during the hiring process what their moral expectations of employees are.

If Aloma Methodist ECLC presents itself as representing the God we know in and through Jesus, they owe it to the world around them, the culture in which they serve, to love the other. If this means anything, it at least means treating them with respect.

Simply put: I’m pretty sure that if Jesus wouldn’t allow a lesbian to work for him, he wouldn’t have hired her in the first place.

Go, thou, and do likewise.

Rights v Right makes wrong

Too much excess?

I like to think I am a “make your point and move on” kind of guy.  I tire of repetition. Especially when I feel like it is repetition for repetition’s sake.

But this one thing bears repeating.

During this season of Lent, we are looking at excess and what to do about it.  We believe that we live in a culture of excess – voices around us, and in us, tell us we should want more, we should have more, we need more.
Jesus, on the other hand, calls us in the opposite direction.  Jesus recognized that stuff – money, food, clothing, power, media, friends, etc., cannot satisfy.  Only God and a relationship with God can satisfy the deep longing of our souls.
Yet, as much as we talk about excess and our mutiny against it, we are not being judgmental.  Let me repeat that: we are NOT judging you or your excess or other people in their excess.
We are not even judging ourselves in our own excess.
Our intent, during this season of Lent, is to open ourselves to God’s presence and God’s leading. Judging can be off-putting and conversation-ending.  We want to start the conversation or continue it.  We want to admit to ourselves and one another that excess challenges us and that following Jesus means getting all excess out of the way.
If all of it is too much for you right now, feel free to start with a little.
Too much excess?

Jesus Loves Everyone Except Greg Hardy

Just when you thought it was safe to watch professional football again, Jerry Jones and the Dallas Cowboys sign Greg Hardy to a 1 year contract.

We couldn’t be more excited.

We couldn’t be more outraged.

If my facebook newsfeed is any indication, everyone loves @DaleHansen‘s commentary on this incident. “Is there no line you won’t cross? Is there any crime you won’t accept? Is there no behavior you will not tolerate?”

Great questions, Dale.  As we approach Easter, here’s my answer:

All of Greg Hardy’s behaviors are included in Jesus’ willingness to give up his life to reconcile humanity with God.  While we’re at it, all of your behaviors, and mine too, fit in that list.

Should Greg Hardy be punished for his behaviors?  Should you? Should I?  We have a criminal justice system to weigh those questions and mete out answers.

Perhaps if we are so opposed to violence, we can find other things to do with our time and money than support the NFL.

Or at least we can admit that we look elsewhere for moral exemplars.

I absolutely believe that professional athletes (like TV sports commentators) do well to consider they are role models whether they like it or not.

As a parent, and especially as a pastor, I am also a role model. Whether I like it or not.

One of the roles I must model is that of forgiveness.  I have no business talking about a savior who offers not only forgiveness but transformation if I don’t model the same.

A long time ago, someone wisely wrote “Adopt the attitude that was in Christ Jesus…” (Philippians 2)

BTW, Greg, if you read this, I apologize for the title.  To be clear, I fully believe Jesus loves you.  I apologize for the way we are treating you.

Jesus Loves Everyone Except Greg Hardy

Make Yourself

I knew this day would come.  In fact, in an odd way, I hoped this day would come.

When I took on blogging daily for Lent, I knew I wouldn’t have something worth writing about everyday.  So far I’ve done pretty well. Some days I’ve written ahead.

I’ve started observing the world around me, and the thoughts in my head, keeping in mind that I need my next topic.

It’s gotten so bad that I thought I had a topic or two from Mickey Mouse Clubhouse this morning.  And that from seeing mere bits of it as I passed through the room.

But, I’ve got nothing.

So, I suppose, like any episode of Seinfeld, this post is about nothing.

Or, more to the point, this post is about following through.  I have committed to blogging each day.  I have not committed to having something worth blogging each day.  I have not committed to making this worth your reading.

The promise I made was to do something.  I didn’t promise quality.

Yet I am reminded of that art class where the teacher divided the class into 2 groups.  One would be graded on the quantity of pieces they produced, the other one only their best piece.

Those from the first group not only produced more pieces of art (obviously), they also produced better work.

Sometimes you just have to do it.  Go through the motions.  Make yourself do something you know you should do, even when you don’t feel like it.

Who knows: this simple thing might be all it takes to keep you honest in that moment.  And it might actually make a difference for someone else.

Make Yourself

How close is too close?

As with most Mondays, I follow Rachel to work in the mornings.  She drives the kids to preschool, then we go to work.  Sometimes We leave home at about the same time, sometimes I follow by a few minutes.  Today, I was right behind her all the way.

toocloseThe first time we reached a stoplight, I pulled up very close behind her.  Closer than I would normally do in traffic.

Closer than I am comfortable when I look in my rearview mirror and see someone else.

This was not exactly like normal traffic, though.  I was driving behind a person I know and who knows me. Once the light changed, I gave her appropriate lead time, and followed at a safe distance.

After I had pulled that close, though, I became a  little uncomfortable with what I had done.  I wondered how analogous driving patterns are for personal relationships.

You know: people have very different senses of personal space!  I remember particularly a professor I worked with at one point in my academic life.  He was, what we called, a space invader.

For normal conversation, he would stand within a foot of me.  Though I never felt threatened or endangered in any way, standing this close to a professional acquaintance was uncomfortable for me.

Thankfully, I was a good 6 inches taller than he, so could find space by looking up a little.

In addition to these, I’ve come to notice many different ways we live in space relationship with others.

Just yesterday, in fact, a variant:  I entered the sanctuary well before the next worship service and proceeded to greet the few people who were already there.  As I approached one, he asked if he could talk to me briefly.  I said yes, and as he stood he said, relatively quietly, that this was confidential.

I leaned in a little and nodded to indicate my understanding.

Then, with a raised voice (to normal conversation level, but clearly loud enough for others to hear), he proceeded to tell me what he had to say.

I thought about asking if he was familiar with the word “confidential,” but choose not to.

What he meant, I think, was that he was telling me this “for my own good,” and not for me to tell others.

I had moved close enough to listen, only to find out I really hadn’t needed to get closer at all.

How sensitive are you to the space around you, and the distances you maintain from others?

How close is too close?

Racial This, Ethnic That…

The first step is admitting you have a problem. Or, in this case, the first step is admitting you have an identity.

A racial identity.

An ethnic identity.

Once more I received notice from something/somewhere United Methodist offering “racial/ethnic scholarship”

Does this mean that anyone who has a racial or ethnic identification, but only those who have such identification can apply?

Of course not!  It clearly means that emphasis is being made to attract and include people of racial and ethnic minority groups to participate.

Am I opposed to that?  As Pete the Cat would say, “Oh, heavens no!”

Rather, I think that recognizing the condition of racial ethnic minorities as such is not enough.

I think that we ought all recognize our own racial and ethnic identities.

Using “racial/ethnic” as shorthand for “racial/ethnic minorities” maintains the fiction that some of us have no identity except as individuals.  It’s just all those other people – the hyphenateds – who have some specific identity.

That some people have an identity as individuals and others don’t is fiction.

All of us have a story.  More importantly, every one of us has a story and is part of a larger story.

If or when some of us pretend we all have the same story we deny the reality of another person’s story.

If or when some of us pretend that we have no story at all, that we are each just absolute individuals in the moment, we deny social reality and the fact that we live in time.

There is no subset of humanity that can be defined as “racial/ethnic.” We all are.

And I am quite confident we will be better off once we admit it.

Racial This, Ethnic That…

US Christians Demand Religious Freedom…

for everyone!

I have long said that Christian are at our best when we are advocating for the rights, liberties, fair treatment of others.  I suppose I am willing to allege that this is true for everyone, not only for Christians.  But I especially want Christians to own it.

I think it represents Jesus far better than getting all whiney about our own rights, liberties, or fair treatment.

To be fair, people can advocate for their own rights, etc., without being whiney.  This is just my opinion: but US Christians seem to go whiney awfully quickly if we feel our rights, etc. threatened.

Just look at all the fuss we’ve been making over the persecution of Christians around the world lately.  I believe we would make a better case AGAINST persecution of Christians and FOR following Jesus if we opposed all religious persecution.

Speaking of which, I don’t know if you noticed, but a case of religious freedom was argued before the US Supreme Court yesterday. Samantha Elauf was 17 when she applied to work at an Abercrombie and Fitch store.  She was rated as a very good candidate.  Her rating dropped when management found out she wore a hajib – a traditional headcovering worn by some Muslims.  This dropped her rating enough that she wasn’t hired.

I don’t know how the case will come out.  The report I heard indicated that most of the Justices, in oral arguments, sounded like they leaned in her favor.

I have heard Christians lament about not being allowed to wear cross necklaces to work; shouldn’t we be just as concerned for the religious liberty of others?

US Christians Demand Religious Freedom…