Pentecost: When God’s Kingdom comes to you!

Here is the manuscript of my sermon for this past Sunday. It was Pentecost. The scripture readings were Acts 2:1-21 and John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15 

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For seven weeks now we have been focusing on the presence of God’s Kingdom.

Many have been sold a bill of goods that eternal life is only about what happens after you die.

Just because someone is selling a bill of goods doesn’t mean you have to buy it.

Jesus never offered eternal life as something you pick up or receive after you die. He said that he came that we might live life to the fullest (John 10:10)  Jesus himself defined eternal life this way, in his prayer for his followers in John 17:  This is eternal life: to know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you sent. (verse 3)

And this “living life to the fullest” and this “knowing the obly true God and Jesus Christ whom God sent” become real – reachable, attainable, graspable – for us in the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ.  Jesus being raised from the dead means that God’s victory over death starts now!

Or, more accurately, Jesus being raised from the dead means that God’s victory over death started almost 2,000 years ago.

And, just in case this isn’t clear, God’s victory over death isn’t just for God: it is for us!

It is for God because God created humans for fellowship – for partnership in caring for the beautiful world God has given us to live in! But it is also for us because God loves us and wants us to learn to live in the freedom and joy that comes from living as we were created to live in the first place!

This is why we are invited daily – maybe even more often than that – to come, enter the Kingdom! Because this is what God wants for us.

And we have all seen the Kingdom of God.  Many of us, if not all of us have spent some time there.  Many of us have had the great pleasure of opening the presence of God’s Kingdom to others and then received the indescribable joy of watching them, listening to them know the love of their Creator!

You’ve been there!

  • You volunteer in so many ways at South Euless Elementary.
  • You collect change to support the United Community Centers in Fort Worth.
  • You teach Sunday School
  • You help feed people at Arlington Life Shelter.
  • You travel up to 14 hours to spend a week sleeping on floors and taking cold showers to serve people you’ve never met.
  • You sing in the choir.
  • You work harder than your doctor probably wants you to to stock our Food Pantry and to serve food to those who, for WHATEVER reason humble themselves to come here looking for food.
  • You visit people in prison.
  • You smoke hams in December.
  • You serve in dozens of different ways in your church and community because you feel like following Jesus calls us beyond ourselves.

You’ve SEEN God’s Kingdom from here.  You’ve BEEN God’s Kingdom from here.

Ah, but today, today, we raise the bar.

Today we celebrate that God lives IN us.  With us ALWAYS and FOREVER.

Today, we welcome the Holy Spirit – our Companion, the Comforter, the Advocate, the Spirit of Truth!

Today we celebrate Pentecost, derived from the Jewish Festival of Weeks, which was held 7 weeks following Passover.

You probably know this story: it was read for us this morning from Acts 2.  It’s known sometimes as “the birthday of the Church.”

Church starts when the Holy Spirit shows up. We traditionally remember this every Sunday with the presence of the open flame – on candles – on the table.

When, the Holy Spirit showed up “ They saw what seemed to be individual flames of fire alighting on each one of them.” Then they heard them all speak in other languages.

There’s a lot to be made of speaking in tongues. There’s a lot of debate about speaking in tongues.  While I enjoy discussion over differences, and sometimes even debate, today isn’t about debate.  Today is about the Holy Spirit coming and empowering us to live in the Kingdom of God now.

So whatever you think of speaking in tongues, look what happened thereby: people gathered from the known world ALL heard the good news!

May you and I, by the presence and power of the Holy Spirit, speak the Good News so that everyone may understand it!

May those who feel trampled on by all us religious folk be able to hear the good news through us!

May those who feel trampled by the world: economic, political, whatever, be able to hear the good news through us!

May those who do not have family or friends close enough to consider family be able to hear the good news through us!

May those estranged from their parents, or estranged from their children, be able to hear the good news through us!

May those dogged by addiction be able to hear the good news through us!

May those bearing the weight of depression be able to hear the good news through us!

May the hypocrite in each of us be able to hear the good news through us!

May the ones among us who feel they’ve been part of the church too long to actually open themselves to the kind of change and healing God and God alone can bring be able to hear the good news through us!

The Holy Spirit is here, among us! God’s Spirit blows wherever it wishes. You hear its sound, but you don’t know where it comes from or where it is going. (John 3:8)

The Spirit took Peter to the book of Joel (from the Old Testament):

In the last days, God says,
I will pour out my Spirit on all people.
Your sons and daughters will prophesy.
Your young will see visions.
Your elders will dream dreams.
Even upon my servants, men and women,
I will pour out my Spirit in those days,
and they will prophesy.
I will cause wonders to occur in the heavens above
and signs on the earth below,
blood and fire and a cloud of smoke.
The sun will be changed into darkness,
and the moon will be changed into blood,
before the great and spectacular day of the Lord comes.
And everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.

Two more points, then I’ll let you out of this thing.  First, let’s go back to the reason all these folks were in Jerusalem to begin with.  The Feast of Weeks or Shavuot. referenced in Exodus, Leviticus, and Deuteronomy (Exodus 23 & 34, Leviticus 23, and Deuteronomy 16) came to mark both the celebration of thanksgiving for the grain harvest and  of Moses’ returning from Mt. Sinai with the law.

Here’s how Deuteronomy explains it:

Count out seven weeks, starting the count from the beginning of the grain harvest. At that point, perform the Festival of Weeks for the Lord your God. Offer a spontaneous gift in precise measure with the blessing the Lord your God gives you. Then celebrate in the presence of the Lord your God—you, your sons, your daughters, your male and female servants, the Levites who live in your cities, the immigrants, the orphans, and the widows who are among you—in the location the Lord your God selects for his name to reside. Remember how each of you was a slave in Egypt, so follow these regulations most carefully. (Deuteronomy 16:9-12)

Offer a spontaneous gift in precise measure with the blessing the Lord your God gives you. Then celebrate in the presence of the Lord your God….

So, these people had come from all over the known world: Parthians, Medes, and Elamites; as well as residents of Mesopotamia, Judea, and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the regions of Libya bordering Cyrene; and visitors from Rome (both Jews and converts to Judaism), Cretans and Arabs. They were here to offer a spontaneous gift “in precise measure with the blessing” God had given them.

What blessings has God given you?  What would offering a “spontaneous gift in precise measure” look like?

All these people had come to do their duty, their religious duty. Shavuot was one of three annual festivals jewish men were expected to come to Jerusalem to celebrate. They came as they had likely come many times before.

They came to give to God “in precise measure” according to how God had blessed them.

They came to give, and in return they received an outpouring of the Holy Spirit.

They couldn’t outgive God.  We cannot outgive God.

Today is Pentecost. We celebrate and remember the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, our Comforter, our Advocate, the Spirit of Truth.

The law expected God’s people to give back in precise measure as they had been blessed by God.

And then, God blesses them beyond their imagination with the Holy Spirit. The indwelling of the very presence of God.

They all heard and they all understood in their own language, in a way that they each could accept and receive.

Ok.  I think that’s a lot to grasp.  Let’s take a moment before concluding.

Take a moment just to breathe.

In. Out. Slow breathe, deep breathe.  Repeat.

Did you know that the average human takes 26,000 breaths a day? While we ought to breath deeply and take 4-6 breaths per minute, most of us breath shallow quick breaths at a rate of 15 per minute.

No matter how fast or slow, how deep or shallow you breathe, if you stop breathing you stop living.

Here’s a funny thing about that – about breathing – that I want you to know today.  Breath and Spirit are closer than you think.

In fact, in both Hebrew and Greek, the words from which we get “breath” and “spirit” are related.

So much so, in fact, that in Psalm 51:11, which says, “Please don’t throw me out of your presence; please don’t take your holy spirit away from me,” the word translated “spirit” is the same word as “breath.”

Here it is in context:

Create a clean heart for me, God;
put a new, faithful spirit deep inside me!
Please don’t throw me out of your presence;
please don’t take your holy spirit away from me.
Return the joy of your salvation to me
and sustain me with a willing spirit.

Could the Holy Spirit be God breathing into you?

Remember in Genesis 2, where God creates the first humans?  What does God do after they were formed out of the dust?  Breathed the breath of life into them.

No breath, no life.

And breath and spirit come from the same word.  Breath and spirit come from the same place.

Every time you breathe in, you welcome the gift of life that God has given you. Every time you breathe in, you can also welcome the Holy Spirit.

Please notice that life is more than just breathing in all the time.  If you breathe in, you must also breathe out.

The Holy Spirit doesn’t come into us, like breath, to be held, but to be let out, to be shared.

Take a moment just to breathe.

In. Out. Slow breathe, deep breathe.  Repeat.

Let us pray

Pentecost: When God’s Kingdom comes to you!

A Little Stress, Anyone?

For Lent, I’ve been preaching a series based on Jan Hatmaker’s book 7. We’ll finish this Sunday.

Stress is the final topic.

Got stress?

I’ve had some this week. Maybe I’ll tell you about next week.

I think it will make for a good sermon this Sunday. If you don’t have a church home and live in the DFW area, visit Euless First United Methodist Church this Sunday and we will make it worth your while.

If you live elsewhere, or just can’t make it this Sunday, check out our webpage Monday or after where you can find and download the sermon.

But you would rather be there Sunday. Our choir is worth the trip.

A Little Stress, Anyone?

I Need You Need We Need

needYou need to read this post.  All of it.

Ok; you may not need to read it.  But I think you’ll get my point in having said that.

I have recently become aware of a conversational habit. It seems to me to be growing in our culture.

This habit involves the word “need.”  My concern is over who is doing the needing.

I have noticed more than a few times that need seems to be very easily attributed to others.

In simple terms, if I need you to do something, I say, “You need to….”

For example, you need to read this post. This actually means I need you to read this post.

This is problematic.  At least it is problematic for me, and for people like me.  You see, I, and people like me, do not easily or comfortably absorb the needs of others.  Especially when these needs are foisted upon us from a pretence of power.

Don’t assign me your needs.  Own them. Share them if you like, but don’t assign them to me.

I find this especially dangerous in ministry. Even more in youth ministry.  Folks in leadership: your leadership and integrity are seriously compromised when you assign your needs to others.

For example, if you are trying to quiet a room full of people because you need to make an announcement or begin a worship service or for whatever reason, telling them “You need to be quiet” may be neither true nor as effective as “I need you to be quiet.”

Own your needs.  Feel free to share them, but inviting others to share them will be more likely effective than assigning it to them.

I need you to know this.

I Need You Need We Need

Do you really want what you want?

snowroofAfter a few fleeting moments of playing in the snow this morning, the kids were inside, warm, and dry. And ready to watch something.

Hello, Netflix!

Eliza wanted to watch Annie.

Liam wanted to watch Mater’s Tale Tales. Then Mr. Peabody and Sherman.

It turns out it was Liam’s turn to choose, so two things happened:

1) we started Mr. Peabody and Sherman, and
2) Eliza threw a small fit.

It was a very small fit: actually fairly worthy of the moment, and quickly left behind.
Within minutes – no more than 10 – both of them were enjoying the movie.

This is how it often goes with our kids.  Loudly (and proudly?) claim your preference.  Get louder if someone else claims an alternative preference.

Stand your ground

Raise the stakes

Refuse to listen, negotiate, or compromise.

Throw a fit if you don’t get your way.

I realized yesterday that we don’t necessarily unlearn this pattern as we grow up.

We don’t always want what we want. Sometimes we just don’t want to let someone else have a say.

It’s hard to listen when you are shouting, “My way or the highway!”

While this is worth considering for anyone, I particularly hope my church, the United Methodist Church #UMC, will give it thought.

We’ve not been listening so well to each other lately.  On some things, we have dug in for decades and refused to actually listen.

We want what we want. Or do we?

Do you really want what you want?

Welcome!

Every so often, I am “surprised” by my children greeting me as I come through the door from the garage into the house.  As I open the door, they are both crouched a few feet back, and together they jump up and yell “surprise!”

Honestly, I’m not really surprised.  I hear it coming.

More honestly, nothing could make me happier.

A good friend of mine once imagined out loud that heaven must be Mrs. Johnson’s doughnuts and touch football. He said this, of course, as a way of saying that he understood those two things – eating doughnuts and playing football as pure joyful relaxation.

I might define heaven as being greeted at the door by my children, full of energy and joy.

I wouldn’t be surprised if they might rather be upstairs playing or watching a show.  It doesn’t make any difference to me if they went to the back door begrudgingly at mom’s request.

All that matters in that moment is the beaming faces of my children glad to see me.

Comparing oneself to God can be really risky, but when I think about being greeted that way, I cannot help but wonder what joy it might bring God when you and I take the time to stop whatever else we are doing and welcome God into our presence.

You can shout “Surprise!” if you want.  God won’t likely be surprised; but I can almost guarantee God will smile. Even if you do it because someone else suggested it, give it a try.

I can imagine a little of what God must feel like.  And it is very, very good!

Welcome!